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20121121
20121121
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to be seen. but then that will require some other tax. that would be my big request like everybody else. get america's finances under control and that will take both parties. it will take taxes and it will take reduction in commitments that have been made. it now can be validated. let's get this but do it in a way that exacerbates the uncertain economy. the second -- we have to happen through innovation. whether it is the space program or tax credits for renewable energy. all that is important. we have to keep that going. that will get hard because we will face is demographics. that is my 74th birthday on april 7. i am aware of the and aging population which i have become and we are an aging population relative to what we were. luckily, we have millions of fresh arrivals that are younger and are energetic and they come from all over the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of my favorite books on the roman republic. how did this v
government, ok. this is tax incentives. you have to have tax liability. you have to pay taxes to make this thing valuable to you, but most people do. the law is written at 30% of the cost you can have a tax credit of 30%. let's talk about real numbers. what am i paying now and what am i going to be paying in the future? if i can make money today on my monthly payment and go green, why not? solar kind of reverses the effect. it's like tax brackets. the return on investment typically is higher if you got a big bill. there is also another thing about time of use rates. i want to go over it very briefly. it does have some effect and you will hear it about on your bid. the time of use rate is a way that you tilts are trying to help -- utilities are trying to manage their peak demand. you charge people more during peak periods. you make it up to them by charging the low market rate off peak. this is off peak and you'll be charged a very low rate for it. at shoulder peak you'll be charged more. at on peak, you'll be charged the most, another shoulder, another off peak. so what happens is tha
. to the extent that taxes go up, personal taxes go up, i assume that's going to affect -- could affect people in their plans to do, you know, kitchens and bathroom remodels. but there is some uncertainty. but at this point in time we're projecting to end the year to $7 million. that includes 5 million in revenue and 2 million in expenditures. right now year over year if you compare where we were last year, which remember last year was a good year, where we were last year to in october to a year to date now, we're actually up 37% in revenues. and if you look at the measure -- not the whole measure, but a measure of our issued permits, you see that the majority of the increases occur between the 10,000 to the 1 million, which is a large range. but that's in term of the valuation of the permits. anecdotally we're seeing a lot of permits that are coming through the system. we're seeing a lot of the impact fees being paid now that were incurred in 2005. so, we are seeing people finish up the projects that are sitting -- either doing it because of the economy or it takes a long time to get through
put in tax credits and policies of the public utilities commission to favor alternative energy, independent power production. which is obvious today. when they promoted code- generation it was something very novel. 30 years ago. now you have a different name for a period in his third party power production using power in a driving way to recapture the most efficient way. innovation is important. i have to also, every time we heard the word innovation, i have to put a plug in for tradition. i have a very traditional education. i spent a lot of years in silence speaking latin up in the hills, living within the medieval framework. i do respect the past. we study it. if you are grounded in tradition, you feel quite confident in change and innovation. if you are insecure, you are very reluctant to embrace the unknown. i do think we need to in our education and politics, we have to have a new appreciation for our traditions and the patterns that describe our culture and our being as americans. having said all that, we have saved in california tens of billions in energy efficiency. wh
with some tough budget decisions again, including where to make cuts and whether or not to increase taxes. how will you approached these hard choices? >> our budget is one of the very top challenges facing city government right now. over each of the years i have served, we have had to balance budget deficits that were around $500 million. this year, we're facing another budget deficit of almost $400 million. fortunately in recent years, we have had some ability to do some one-time budgeting tricks that allow us to balance the budget that do not exist this year. in past years, we've received federal stimulus money. we received more monies from the state government. last year our labor unions decided to contribute a quarter of a billion dollars to help balance last year's and this year's budget. those are things we do not have the ability to avail ourselves of us we balance the upcoming budget in a few months. we are faced with far fewer options. i think we are going to have to continue to look at very deep and difficult cuts. our priorities have to be insuring and protecting the most basic
$55 million in tax revenue. nightlife is the only significant industry in this city that sometimes gets treated at times as it is a nuisance, a problem to be managed. and of course, we have to focus on making sure it is safe and that people are complying with the laws and that we are not having shooting. but when you get so focused on combating the negatives -- every industry has the negatives. you can sometimes lose sight of the positives and we know there are a huge positives for nightlife in the city. we know that a lot of our street shares are at risk -- street fairs are at risk of being given fees to death. we have completely outdated the planning commission like that mission how are used district, which makes it extremely hard to do anything alcohol related in a big swath of the mission. there was a bowling alley that wanted to go in at 17th and van ness and they were not going to be able to do it because they would have been banned from even selling beer. that is the tip of the iceberg in terms of planning provisions that make it hard to foster a knife in the city. we are no
in a city that is over-taxing the and running down. [applause] >> i do think that you can do a lot through talking to your city supervisor and working through that process. i am telling you, there are ways that began help you. alcohol is a local issue on this type of matter. what we are behind would you guys want to do, whenever that is. a lot of times we do not always have statutes that make that much sense. it is partly the ways that the laws have evolved and we are the ones who are stuck with enforcing them the way that they are. that does not necessarily mean that we think they are particularly good ideas, but we certainly want people to grow, prosper, and be saved. that can be achieved in all sorts of ways. we want to work with you on that. thank you. >> i was the founding president of the entertainment commission. i retired and went on to found the culture association, the first trade association statewide for night life, bar, and restaurant activities. i am here with a question that plagues a lot of these license holders, who desire to have their establishment opened for all age dan
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

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